8:00–8:45 a.m.   |   Registration Opens & Breakfast Networking

Welcome to the 2017 Social Enterprise Conference.

8:45–9:00 a.m.   |   Welcome Remarks & Conference Objectives

Welcome to the 2017 Social Enterprise Conference.

9:00–9:50 a.m.   |   Opening Keynote: Keynote Title Here

Opening Keynote – lecture description here.

Speaker Name
Title
at Org

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10:00–10:30 a.m.   |   A Background on the Societal Challenges

During this year’s conference, attendees will have the opportunity to learn the skill set needed for mapping out a societal challenge and identifying solutions. Speakers will provide a brief background on the societal challenges in four topic areas: climate change, job creation for formerly incarcerated people (FIPs), the refugee crisis, and education reform. This session will set the stage for our hackathon later in the day, where participants will use the insights and best practices from conference speakers to create strategies and solutions for impact with cross-disciplinary thinkers, innovators, and changemakers.

Tracy Breslin
Adjunct Associate Professor
at Columbia Business School

Tracy Breslin has dedicated her career to ensuring that all students – regardless of background – have access to a high-quality education that prepares them to succeed in school and life. Tracy has over seventeen years of experience in education and nonprofit management. Tracy has served as a talent management consultant since 2011, working with a variety of urban school districts and state departments of education on initiatives including school leadership, principal supervisors, educator evaluations, talent management, and more. As Interim Chief Talent Officer at Newark Public Schools, she designed and led the district’s human capital reform agenda to ensure that there is an effective teacher in every classroom and leader in every school. She facilitated district-union negotiations leading to a breakthrough teacher contract including one of the nation’s first comprehensive performance-based compensation systems, peer observers in evaluations, and school empowerment and flexibility. Tracy also led teams to redesign educator evaluation, develop and implement new teacher and principal selection processes, create a new Talent Division, and institute a school-based strategic staffing system to promote mutual matches based on principal autonomy and educator choice. Before becoming an independent consultant, Tracy worked at the New York City Department of Education. As the Executive Director of the Office of School Leadership, she led a team to recruit, select, train, and evaluate 1,600 principals and 3,500 assistant principals. Previously, as the Director of School Leadership, Tracy coordinated programs to train and support aspiring and current school leaders. Prior to joining the NYC DOE, Tracy led recruitment and admissions at New Leaders for New Schools, a national non-profit organization focused on attracting and preparing outstanding school leaders. She also led organizational strategy, fund development, and talent identification to support the organization’s expansion. Tracy launched her career in public education by evaluating and designing Universal PreKindergarten programs, working in after-school programs, and facilitating professional development for educators. Tracy has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BS in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University. She is a graduate of the Broad Residency in Urban Education.

Gregory B. Fairchild
Isidore Horween Research Associate Professor of Business Administration
Associate Dean for Washington, D.C. Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship
at Darden School of Business

Gregory Fairchild is the Isidore Horween Research Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business and Associate Dean for Washington, D.C. Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship. Fairchild serves as an academic director for Darden’s Institute for Business in Society (IBiS). He teaches strategic management, entrepreneurship and ethics in Darden’s MBA and Executive Education programs. He has received a number of awards for teaching excellence at the Darden School.

His research is likewise renowned, as he was recently the lead investigator studying business models and public policy issues in the field of community development finance, an initiative supported by a three-year $850,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Fairchild was named one of five high impact research professors and the sole scholar focused in entrepreneurship by the Financial Times in 2010. In 2009, he received a faculty Pioneer Award presented by the Aspen Institute’s Center for Business Education for his leadership and risk taking in integrating ethical, environmental and social issues into the MBA curriculum. In 2011, he was the only academic named as one of “25 Virginians to watch” by Virginia Business Magazine. In 2012, Fairchild was named one of the Top Ten Business School Professors in the World by CNN/Fortune and one of the 50 Best Business School Professors by Poets & Quants. His multidisciplinary work has been cited byInc. MagazineThe Economist, National Public Radio (NPR), USA TodayNew York Timesand the Washington Post, among others.

Fairchild worked in marketing positions for such industry leaders as Kraft General Foods, Procter & Gamble and Saks Fifth Avenue before embarking on his doctoral studies. Fairchild serves on the Virginia Retirement Service (VRS), the Commonwealth’s public pension fund. In addition to his teaching and research, he is a consultant to corporations, nonprofits and governmental agencies.

Fairchild and his wife, Tierney Temple Fairchild (D ’94) are the founders of Resilience Education, an organization committed to providing high quality Socratic education to those that might not otherwise afford it (www.Resilience-Education.org). This is the conduit through which the Darden Prison Program is administered, among other initiatives.

Bruce M. Usher
Co-Director of the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise; Elizabeth B. Strickler ’86 and Mark T. Gallogly ’86 Faculty Director; Professor of Professional Practice
at The Tamer Center for Social Enterprise

Bruce Usher is a Professor of Practice and The Elizabeth B. Strickler ’86 and Mark T. Gallogly ’86 Faculty Director of the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School. Professor Usher teaches MBA students on the intersection of finance, social and environmental issues, and is a recipient of the Dean’s Award for Teaching Excellence. Prior to his work at Columbia, Professor Usher was CEO of EcoSecurities Group plc, during which time he built it into the world’s largest carbon credit company. EcoSecurities developed more than 400 projects in 36 countries, representing approximately 10% of all projects approved by the United Nations under the Kyoto Protocol. EcoSecurities was acquired by JP Morgan in 2009. Usher was previously the co-founder and CEO of TreasuryConnect LLC, which provided electronic trading solutions to banks and was acquired in 2001. Prior to that, he worked in financial services for twelve years in New York and Tokyo. Professor Usher is an active investor and advisor to entrepreneurial ventures focused on climate change and clean energy (UsherWorks.com). He is a board member of Community Energy Inc., OptiRTC Inc, the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships, and is Chairman of the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures. Usher earned an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School.

10:30–10:45 a.m.  |   Coffee Break

Head over the the Auditorium entrance for a refill on coffee and a chance to mingle with fellow conference attendees.

10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.  |   Defining the Challenge & Identifying Opportunities for Impact

Conventional problem-solving tools often lead to run-of-the-mill solutions, hence in a fast-changing world, the problem-solving methodology has to be different. In collaboration with TYTHEdesgin, this year’s conference will provide participants an opportunity to go beyond the theoretical and put techniques into practice by working in teams on real-world challenges.
Participants will have the opportunity to join workshop groups with fellow attendees from across the University to identify impactful strategies for problem-solving one of our four selected topics: climate change, job creation for formerly incarcerated people (FIPs), the refugee crisis, and education reform.
This first session will introduce participants to a series of tools and frameworks that will help define the challenges and identify areas in which your group can have the most impact. After participating in this workshop, students can expect to apply this skillset to any challenge or cause they hope to have impact on in their future endeavors.

Kristina Drury
Founder & Creative Director
at TYTHEdesign

Kristina Drury is a social entrepreneur, designer, and educator. Over the past five years, Kristina has led TYTHE to work with over 75 clients and support organizations creating impact on a local and global scale.

Prior to starting TYTHEdesign, Kristina co-led the nonprofit Project H Design, a charitable organization focused on design for social change, and directed social innovation at Get Storied. Her diverse background includes work in corporate social responsibility, education, social innovation, industrial design, and architecture. She holds a Masters in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute and a Bachelors of Science in Architecture.

Kristina’s work and publications have been taken root around the globe. She has been recognized by numerous organizations, including the Victor J. Papanek Social Design Awards, the Core 77 Awards, Pratt Institute, Public Policy Lab and the UNDP. Most recently, she  has recently been recognized as an Agent of Change by the Centre for Social Innovation.

12:15–1:30 p.m.  |   Lunch & Networking

Grab some lunch and head to the Auditorium. Network with fellow participants over lunch and hopefully meet a new friend!

1:30–2:15 p.m.   |   Aligning Business + Social Mission

Interested in learning how some businesses are currently addressing these challenges? Join us in the session as we hear from entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs as they share how their ventures and organizations are taking innovative approaches to solving societal challenges. These quick talks showcase different strategies for impact, as well as provide examples in business models that have a social impact mission at the forefront.

Aligning Business + Social Mission – Education Reform

Matthew Robins ’13BUS
CEO
at DeansList

Matt Robins is the CEO of DeansList, a software platform that helps schools manage all their non-academic data and parent communication/engagement tools in a single place. Matt started DeansList with BUS’13 classmate Akshai Patel with a mission to specifically address the needs of schools in low-income communities that are actively tackling the achievement gap. Together with their school partners, they develop unique solutions to engage every stakeholder in a child’s education: students, teachers, administrators and parents.

Prior to DeansList, Matt spent six years as a consultant with PwC’s Forensic Technology Advisory groups. There a large portion of his client work included helping banks and lenders assess their data in the wake of the sub-prime mortgage crisis.

Matt has a degree in Information Systems from Carnegie Mellon University and an MBA from Columbia Business School.

2:15–4:00 p.m.   |   Building Out an Idea and Fine-tuning the Social Business Model Canvas

Continuing from our Defining the Challenge and Identifying Opportunities for Impact session, attendees will further deep-dive into their societal challenges to build out their solution and fine-tune a social business around that solution. TYTHEdesign will introduce new tools and frameworks on how to build out your innovative solutions to these challenges and techniques for ways to surge ahead.

Participants will be able to take these techniques and apply them to their own work in the social impact sector, as well as gain the experience of walking through a full-day workshop centered around solving societal challenges and today’s most pressing issues.

Kristina Drury
Founder & Creative Director
at TYTHEdesign

Kristina Drury is a social entrepreneur, designer, and educator. Over the past five years, Kristina has led TYTHE to work with over 75 clients and support organizations creating impact on a local and global scale.

Prior to starting TYTHEdesign, Kristina co-led the nonprofit Project H Design, a charitable organization focused on design for social change, and directed social innovation at Get Storied. Her diverse background includes work in corporate social responsibility, education, social innovation, industrial design, and architecture. She holds a Masters in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute and a Bachelors of Science in Architecture.

Kristina’s work and publications have been taken root around the globe. She has been recognized by numerous organizations, including the Victor J. Papanek Social Design Awards, the Core 77 Awards, Pratt Institute, Public Policy Lab and the UNDP. Most recently, she  has recently been recognized as an Agent of Change by the Centre for Social Innovation.

4:00–4:30 p.m.   |   Coffee Break

Head over the the Auditorium entrance for a refill on coffee and a chance to mingle with fellow conference attendees.

4:30–5:15 p.m.   |   Closing Keynote: Business for the Common Good

From philanthropic enterprises to major global corporations, business leaders and entrepreneurs are taking the lead in helping to make a better world for all. Bob Forrester and Daryl Brewster will discuss the history and direction of philanthropy and social impact. At the forefront of philanthropy, Newman’s Own believes that each of us, through the power of philanthropy, has the potential to make a difference. Since 1982, the foundation has donated more than $495 million to thousands of nonprofit organizations helping people in need around the world.

This dynamic fireside chat will explore how CECP (founded by Paul Newman) partners with foundations like Newman’s Own to engage a coalition of CEOs who believe that societal improvement is an essential measure of business performance. CECP has grown to a movement of more than 200 of the world’s largest companies that represent $7 trillion in revenues, $18.6 billion in societal investment, 13 million employees, and $15 trillion in assets under management.

Robert H. Forrester

President and CEO
at Newman’s Own Foundation
Executive Chairman
at Newman’s Own, Inc.

Newman’s Own combines two of the most widely admired aspects of the American character; business entrepreneurship and philanthropic generosity. Founded in 1982 by Paul Newman, the Company began with a single product of oil and vinegar salad dressing, and was guided by two principles; “Quality Will Always Trump the Bottom Line” and “All Profits to Charity”. Paul started Newman’s Own Foundation in 2005 to ensure these founding principles would continue after his passing, and asked Bob to be its first President.

Upon Paul’s passing in 2008, the Foundation became the sole owner of the Company and all the intellectual properties and licenses associated with the brand, and Bob assumed the additional role as Chairman and CEO of the Company. In 2015, he transitioned to Executive Chairman of the Company and continues as President and CEO of the parent, Newman’s Own Foundation. As of May 2017, the Company has over 300 products in the market, and total paid contributions exceed $496 million to thousands of charities around the world.

In 1980, Bob founded Payne, Forrester & Associates, LLC, (PFA), a consulting group providing services to nongovernmental organizations in the areas of strategic planning, governance, communications and fundraising. He was Chairman and CEO until 2008, during which time PFA served over 550 clients in the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

From 1976 to 1980, he headed the NYU Development Office and was a member of the senior management team recruited to lead the turnaround of the then financially troubled University. From 1969-1975, he worked at the University of Hartford as Director of Development and Special Assistant to the President.

Between 1979 and 1990, he also built and owned Martha’s Vineyard Cable Television Company and FM radio station, WMVY.

Fiduciary Boards – CECP (formerly Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy), University of Hartford, SeriousFun Children’s Network, Safe Water Network, Newman’s Own Foundation, and Newman’s Own, Inc.

Advisory Boards – Discovery Center, Connecticut Council of Philanthropy, the Centers for Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation of the American Association of Colleges & Universities, and Martha’s Vineyard YMCA.

Bob holds a B.S. in Psychology, with graduate work at N.Y.U and the University of Hartford, and served as an Army Officer with duty in the Republic of Vietnam. He has received Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degrees from Mount Holyoke College and the University of Hartford.

5:15 p.m.   |   Closing Remarks & Thank you

Thank you for joining us at the 2017 Social Enterprise Conference!

Thayná Teixeira da Silva ’18BUS
MBA Candidate
at Columbia Business School

Bio Here.

JoAnne Williams ’18BUS
MBA Candidate
at Columbia Business School

Bio Here.